6 Sneaky but Scientific Ways to Help Kids Learn

Hello readers, I really hope you are enjoying the articles I have been posting on my blog!  I have already received great feed back from many of you!  I was asked one question recently that really struck close to my heart.

(Concerned Parent) “Renee, how do I get my child to want to learn?”

(Me) “I had trouble getting my daughter to want to learn all throughout school, this is a common problem.  But then I realized that maybe there is a way of tricking my daughter into learning without her even knowing.  We do it all the time at LearningRx Fresno, we play brain games and through that, our clients are increasing their cognitive abilities without even knowing it.”

(Concerned Parent) “Okay how do I do that?”

(Me) “Well there are many different ways to do this.  But here is an article for 6 steps to get your child to learn!”

I sent that article to her and after a few weeks of trying out each step, she emailed me saying how much more her child is learning and enjoy it.

So for all your parents out there dealing with this issue, here are 3 of the 6 sneaky tips to get your child to learn:

  1. Play games backwards. For example, “Simon Says, Do the Opposite.” It’s the classic with a twist. If Simon says, “Be quiet,” the kids should be loud.
    Why:
    This helps kids practice inhibitory control, an important executive function. Executive functions also include focus, cognitive flexibility, and working memory. These skills predict academic success at least as well as IQ scores.
  2. Talk about feelings. Encourage your kids to talk about how they feel (She’s sad and frustrated that she left her new necklace at Grandma’s and won’t be able to get it back until next week. She’s also envious of her brother, who remembered his necklace.) Speculate about how others might feel, whether it’s in real life situations (Another driver cut you off, and that made you angry, but maybe that driver was having a terrible horrible no good very bad day) or in a book (Alexander was disappointed when the shoe store had exciting striped sneakers for his brothers but only white ones for him.).
    Why:
    This helps kids learn the skill of empathy. Kids who are able to understand what others are feeling and understand their intentions have smoother transitions to school, college and beyond because they can see others’ point of view.
  3. Tell Stories. Read. Talk about what you’re reading. Read to your kids, or ask them questions about their books. Tell stories. If you go to a friend’s house, encourage the kids to tell the story of the visit later. Family life is filled with what Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley call “business talk.” This kind of talk usually uses simple vocabulary and conveys what an adult wants from a kid. Storytelling and discussion of books uses richer language and is called “extra talk.” Why:
    It promotes good communication skills. In a survey Galinsky conducted, employers were most concerned about employees’ verbal and written communication skills. Extra talk correlates positively with academic performance. Of course, it might also be pleasant.

You can find the rest of the tips and more on the article here: http://time.com/3677430/6-sneaky-but-scientific-ways-to-help-kids-learn/?utm_content=buffer46c14&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

 

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